1006386 / Extend and the Peninsula Research Bank inc extension

Continuation of SAFE (Incorporating RAPID) (Study due to close 14/11/2019)

1204632 / Royal Devon & Exeter Tissue Bank

A randomized, single blind, threefold crossover, single center study to assess the safety and the effects of 1 mg and 5 mg BAY 1193397 in comparison to placebo on skin capillary blood flow and transcutaneous oxygen pressure after single dose in type II diabetic patients with peripheral artery disease (Study due to close 03/08/2021)

1607284 / Use and usefulness of patient experience data: national survey of patient experience leads in NHS acute trusts

The study is an online survey carried out to obtain an understanding of the national picture regarding the collection and use of patient experience data across the NHS.  The survey asks details about the current use of patient experience data wiithin the Trust and forms part of the wider study to explore how patient experience data can be used for service development. (Study due to close 23/11/2015)

1612354 / Do Schwartz Center Rounds® Hold Transformational Power? An Investigation into the Subjective Experiences of NHS Panellists in Devon.

Do Schwartz Center Rounds® Hold Transformational Power? An Investigation into the Subjective Experiences of NHS Panellists in Devon.  (Study due to close 21/09/2017)

1705417 / Evaluating the ten year impact of the Productive Ward at the clinical microsystem level in English acute trusts

Evaluating the ten year impact of the Productive Ward at the clinical microsystem level in English acute trusts (Study due to close 30/06/2018)

1705420 / Effectiveness and Cost-effectiveness of ‘Usual Care’ versus ‘Specialist Integrated Care’: A Comparative Study of Hospital Discharge Arrangements for Homeless People in England

The overall aim of this study is to establish the ways in which specialist integrated homeless health and care (SIHHC) services are being developed and used to facilitate hospital discharge in England. We also aim to examine the impact this is having on quality of care for homeless people admitted to hospital and whether this care can help prevent readmission to hospital shortly afterwards.

The study consists of two distinct, but related, work packages. The first work package (WP1) seeks to gain an informed understanding of the ways in which specialist integrated homeless health and care (SIHHC) services are being developed and implemented to facilitate hospital discharge in England and, relatedly, the impact this is having on quality of care and organisational outcomes such as the prevention of readmission to hospital. The second strand of the research project (WP2) is a data linkage and health economic analysis work package that will work with twenty sites across England where homeless patients have been admitted to hospital.

A cohort of homeless people who have used specialist discharge scheme will be compared to a cohort of homeless people who have not used such provision. We will also compare patient’s hospitalisation history before and after engagement with specialist services. (Study due to close 01/03/2018)

1708477 / HiSLAC

Our five¬year study is based on research in diverse health systems demonstrating poorer outcomes for patients  admitted to hospitals at weekends. In the UK, the importance of this issue has been recognised through four recent  initiatives: the Academy of Medical Royal College’s publications ‘Benefits of Specialist¬Delivered Care’ and the  Academy’s standards document ‘Seven Day Specialist¬Present Care’; the Royal College of Physicians Future Hospital  Commission to examine new ways of providing specialist care; and NHS England’s (Commissioning Board) working  group on implementing seven¬day services.

Our proposal evaluates High¬Intensity Specialist¬Led Acute Care (HiSLAC) to improve the care of acutely ill medical  patients admitted as emergencies to English hospitals, with a particular emphasis on weekend admissions.   We will do this by combining quantitative analysis with qualitative (ethnographic) research to measure quality of care and to  explore cultural and behavioural aspects of a fundamental change in service delivery. We will also assess the health  economic impacts of improving specialist cover over week¬ends.

Specifically we will:

* Develop a measure of the intensity of specialist provision at weekends.
* Measure the current intensity of specialist¬led care and how this changes over time.
* Prospectively evaluate the effect of changing specialist intensity on differences in quality of care between patients  admitted at weekends vs weekdays through a causal and cost-effectiveness model.
* Improve understanding of factors facilitating or impeding the uptake and effectiveness of HiSLAC using ethnographic  exploration.
* Determine the effects of HiSLAC on hospital¬level measures such as length of stay.
* Develop a health economic model with data derived from the project to estimate the cost-effectiveness and budget  impact of increasing specialist intensity. (Study due to close 28/09/2018)